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Some thoughts...

posted Apr 23, 2010, 8:22 PM by Jose Velasquez   [ updated May 2, 2010, 6:01 AM ]
As some of you know I've been working on a project for the International School at which I work. I've completed one of the projects...and it looks fantastic. But this rambling isn't about the project itself, rather the program used to create it: CS3. All I can say is why didn't I use it sooner? What an amazing piece of software. It handled a 600MB TIFF like a knife through butter that's been sitting out at room temperature. And my notebook isn't all that great...2.2gHz core2duo, 512MB video card, and only 3GB of RAM...I have no idea how the program was able to handle a TIFF that huge (with layers included)...but it did. I'm very impressed. There's no way my usual stand-by of paint.net would be able to handle such a beast of a file. I'm going to keep using both, as there are some things that paint.net does much quicker (at least until I can get a better handle of CS3).

***

I'm not sure if the technique I used on a recent image even has a name yet...but it's selective coloring with color (which is kind of a strange term, because traditionally selective coloring is done with black and white or sepia images).

Anyway, here's the story about this image: most people know that the dynamic range of digital is fairly limited. Add to that limitation WB differences, especially at night, and you get images with colors that just don't look anything like what our eyes see. After my school's "International Night" we drove my wife's friend home, and I caught a view of N Seoul Tower that I had never noticed before. After we dropped our friend off at her place, we drove back to the alley I had spotted (we're not neglectful parents...our boy was asleep during all this). I got out of the car (while my wife stayed with our son), and I tried to get the image I had seen...unfortunately one white balance gave me the correct color of the alley/driveway, but a poor redition of the sky, another did just the opposite. Thinking that HDR would solve this I ran the images through CS3...only to have them look over cooked (no matter how much I moved the little slide thingy around). So I decided to just layer the images in paint.net with the foreground on top, and the sky I wanted beneath (I'm still learning CS3's layering system). Anyway, I deleted the nasty sky to reveal the sky I had seen. Here's the final image over @ Flickr: N Seoul Tower 

I don't think this technique is new...but it doesn't seem to have a name yet...I'd like to suggest Selective White Balance Coloring. It's not quite HDR, but it appears to do something similar, and not quite as harsh. It never ceases to amaze me how much praise some over-cooked images get over at Flickr. Maybe I should've done that instead of this more subtle approach...

Till the next rambling or post or review, this is,
~JSV
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